3 years ago
Ames 1849
Guest

I know there was only 1000 made and have seen auction records online, but does anyone know of one of these being offered for sale at this moment? A REAL one, not a copy.

Answer
3 years ago
Donny
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I don't know of any selling at the moment, but I did see one sell last year for $9,200. Here is the listing:

http://www.cowanauctions.com/auctions/item.aspx? ItemId=80848

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2 years ago
PJ Stanley
Guest

I have one That i buoght through the smithsonian institute. Its the real deal i promise and yes they are extremley rare.I do not have the sheath.

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2 years ago
Ron S.
Ace
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Votes: 8

A 1000 would be very rare so I would say they are very rare indeed. Pricing depends on condition and if it has a scabard and its condition.

Reply
2 years ago
Jim Johnson
Guest

I have an original Ames 1849 rifleman's knife that has been authenticated. It has the scabbard, but unfortunately the scabbard is snapped off at the lower brass tip.

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2 years ago
Ron S.
Ace
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Looks like someone has been grinding on the blade. That will devalue the knife.

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2 years ago
BEANCHIP0211
Fresh Member
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Votes: 0

I am aware of the grind marks and their detrimental value on the knife itself. However , it is an authentic piece.

Reply
2 years ago
Ron S.
Ace
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Bean I am not disputing that it is a fine specimen of a knife; I would not kick it out of bed for eating krackers (misspelled on purpose). It just drives me crazy to see fine cutlery put to the wire brush or wire wheel. If one is going to remove corrosion from a blade there are better ways. That being said many blades are worth more with the corrosion left on them and believe it or not surface corrosion many times preserves the metal from corroding any more. We use some aluminum on aircraft that actually is corroded on the surface on purpose.

Reply
2 years ago
BEANCHIP0211
Fresh Member
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I appreciate your concern about the grinding marks. It makes me sick to see it on this knife. That said, I am trying to help a lady sell the knife and scabbard. If you have any suggestions, please give me a call. I need to help her in this matter. Also, is it worth it to try to repair the scabbard, (the leather snapped at the lower brass tip), or find another?

Reply
2 years ago
Ron S.
Ace
Blogs: 9
Forum: 859
Votes: 8

I would not attempt any repairs. Repairing with new products would only devalue it. I would sell it as is. Perhaps you find a true cutlery sharpening expert and see if he can clean the blade and blend out the grinding marks. Someone may think the knife is worth more with a shiny blade.

Reply
2 years ago
jerry g
Guest

i have a 1849 riflemans knife--yes the real deal
all the markings--us-wd ames mfg.co. cabotville 1849 handle--wd--jwr brass and full scabbard

call want to <email>

Reply
2 years ago
BEANCHIP0211
Guest

Hi Jerry,

I also have an Ames rifleman's knife. It has been through the mill, but is authentic. It has the scabbard, but it is broken, (leather snapped at bottom).

I'm looking to sell it for a friend of mine. If you know of anybody give me an email.
Thanks a lot,
Jim Johnson

Reply
2 years ago
George in SC
Guest

How can you identify the knife to see if one is in fact an original? I purchased one in South Carolina at a barn sale in 1995. Any telltale marks to authenticate it? - GC

Reply
2 years ago
George in SC
Guest

Jerry, I believe I have an original one also,..give me a hint as to how I can identify it. I bought mine at a barn sale in S.C. in 1995 and it measures 18" overall with a serial number stamped on the handle. - George

Reply
2 years ago
long knife
Guest

I have an authentic (ames mfg.inc.1849 riflemens knife)
yes very rare only 1000 made from cabotville mass.all the markings and scabbard--from one to ten(1-10) i'll give this knife a ratting of (8).

if intrested <email>

we can a picture

Reply
2 years ago
George in SC
Guest

Hey Long Knife, Sure more pix can be posted. I'm in South Carolina, e-mail = <email> I bought this years ago at a barn sale on a farm in S.C. Old Gent selling it looked like a bearded Gen. Robert E. Lee and said it's a Jim Bowie knife from his Grandfather that was used to hack the heads off chickens for Sunday dinners, when he was a kid. - George

Reply
1 year ago
Glyn93
Guest

I have one for sale with the sheath and still in decent condition

Reply
1 year ago
Pj
Guest

the iron studs are a concern on this one im afraid .

Reply
12 months ago
PJ
Guest

Ron. S.
The knife in the picture is mine. was very surprised to see it on the internet. The person whom you had a chat with Jim Johnson(Beanchip) is the one who broke the scabbard, polished the button on the scabbard and filed the blade. All he was supposed to do was take a picture. Learned a very hard lesson on not letting just anyone handle something so dear to you. Got the knife appraised by Bernard Levine, thought about selling it but after wathching Lincoln last night I think I'll hold onto it. Just an amazing part of history. It is my understanding that the 1000 knives that Ames had stored were brought out to help fight the war.

Reply
9 months ago
Richard Drake
Guest

Hello,

Is your Ames Rifleman Knife still for sale?

Best,

Dick Drake

Reply
9 months ago
George S.C.
Guest

Hi Dick, No not for sale as an original, since I've found this one was not actually manufactured in 1849, but in the early 1900's The old Ames molds, letter / number stamps, and handle pieces were auctioned and sold off to other knife manufacturers. The rivets are pressed in differently and the thong tube halves were not soldered, as they were by Ames in 1849. Also the reason for the serial number stamped in the handle. - George Cast

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