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2 years ago #31
Lynribisi
Guest

Good, good! I've been studying and trying to piece it all together. It was a very chaotic battle, that's for sure. Lots of random actions, lots of mistakes.

Your info has really helped! Thanks so much! Lyn

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2 years ago #32
Lynribisi
Guest

This is so awesome! You guys are amazing! I will post my story for you to see, and if you want credit, I'd be happy to add your names. I'm sure it will get published in a magazine called The Searcher--if I can make it short enough.

Here are some images. I'm still trying to find out where Frances Miller, died 10 Jan 1863 is buried. The obit said Peekskill, which is where Pierre is, so I'm thinking they are together. I hope they were able to find their final resting place together anyway.

Thanks again to all of you! I've decided to make my character of Pierre a complicated man. Leaving a dying wife because he felt the call of duty to his country, but needed the money too. I think times were hard for an iron worker back in those days. (let me know if that is an incorrect assumption.)
He was in Albany in a boarding house in 1860. He was recruited in Garrison, NY. But his wife died in NYC with Edmund, who I assume is his brother, and who took over guardianship of his two boys after they both died.

I figure they would have marched from WA to MD, do you agree with that?

Again, I can't thank you guys enough!

Lyn

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2 years ago #33
Lynribisi
Guest

Hi guys,

Would anyone know where I might find a photograph of the 59th NY Volunteers? I now there are a lot of NY regiments photographed, and I wasn't sure where to look. I've tried Google of course...

Any ideas?

Again, so many thanks for all of your help! Lyn

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2 years ago #34
Ajhall
Master
Blogs: 28
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Votes: 13

Try this link: http://www.archives.nysed.gov/a/research/ res_topics_mi_civilwar_dbintro.shtml

NY state has the best on-line CW database of any state I've run across. You might want to try the National Archives or the Library of Congress. The LOC in particular has a searchable collection of CW photos.

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2 years ago #35
Lynribisi
Guest

Perfect! Thanks! I'll go to those sites now! Lyn

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2 years ago #36
Ajhall
Master
Blogs: 28
Forum: 3,911
Votes: 13

Can you share any of your finds?

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2 years ago #37
Lynribisi
Guest

Gosh, I have a lot of finds already. I just did a bunch of screen captures from the movie Lincoln and Lee Antietam: the Cost of Freedom, a 2009 movie. I'll tell you what: If I come across any photos that I havent' seen before, I"ll post them. If not, I'll post some of my favorites. Unless you have a specific interest--in that case, just let me know.

I'd love to "give back" to this forum.

I'm writing a story about my ancestor in Antietam, and I'm willing to share that as well. But I've barely begun the writing, so that'll be a couple of weeks.

But again, I'm so happy to share!

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2 years ago #38
Ajhall
Master
Blogs: 28
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Votes: 13

Hope it helped

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2 years ago #39
Ajhall
Master
Blogs: 28
Forum: 3,911
Votes: 13

We'd love to have anything you find or write. It's the kind of stuff we crave. Post whatever you wish to post, it's all relevant.

You might also want give a look to Taylor's impressive collection of photos she got thru the LOC

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2 years ago #40
Lynribisi
Guest

Thanks! I found a bunch of new maps that I haven't seen before--but know that I am studying only for the 59th NY, so the data will be limited.

How can I see Taylor's photos? Thanks for a link.

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2 years ago #41
Ron S.
Ace
Blogs: 9
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Shall we post a picture of the 59th's battle flag here?

Of course we shall!

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2 years ago #42
Lynribisi
Guest

Super nice! And was it a big deal when the colors were captured or the color-holder was shot?

I saw some medals given out for that.

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2 years ago #43
Ron S.
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Blogs: 9
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OMG yes the loose of a unit’s colors was and is a bad, bad, thing. Normally if a unit is over run or surrender their colors were captured by or surrendered to the enemy. This was a sign of victory on the enemies’ part.
The flag or colors where not just pretty symbols of a unit or a nation they actually served a tactical purpose. In the olden day’s way back to ancient Egypt Colors, Standards, or Guerdons were used to show the location of the Commander and as a rallying point for the soldiers. During an attack soldiers would basically follow the unit colors. If a soldier got disorientated during battle he would look for his colors in order to reform.
It was considered and still is a great honor to carry the colors into battle although your life expedience is greatly reduced. If the colors barrier fell during battle it was important to get them back up and move with the Commander to keep the attack on line.
Colors also represent the Unit and the members of said unit that is where the pride comes in. During the Gulf War of 1991 I saw Armor units actually flying their unit colors while attacking the Iraqis units.

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2 years ago #44
Donny
Blogs: 0
Forum: 2,563
Votes: 15
Lynribisi wrote:
How can I see Taylor's photos? Thanks for a link.


Here ya go:

http://www.americancivilwarforum.com/cw-photographs- 1323321.html
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2 years ago #45
Lynribisi
Guest

OMG, you are RIGHT! Those are amazing! Taylor, incredible! I can't wait to dive into the NARA site and see what I can find!

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2 years ago #46
Tony Czarnecki
Guest

Lyn -
Pierre Miller is buried @ the Van Cortlandtville Cemetery (formerly St. Paul's Church Cemetery) on Oregon Road in Cortlandt Manor, NY.
He died @ the Battle of Antietam on Sept. 17, 1862 in Sharpsburg, MD.
It is likely that the delay in burial was caused by war dead being initially buried in mass graves @ Antietam (which had the most fatalities of any battle in the Civil War) and/or the financial burden on families to arrange the transportation of their loved one back to the North.
I am finishing a PowerPoint presentation on THE SONS OF PEEKSKILL IN THE CIVIL WAR, which will be held @ the Peekskill Museum, 124 Union Ave. in Peekskill (Westchester County), NY on Sat. Oct. 20th @ 2PM.
Pierre's gravesite is in the PowerPoint program.
Do you have any photo, documents or obit on Pierre Miller?
Send me an e-mail at: <email> and I will attach a photo of Pierre's gravesite & a poster announcing the Oct. 20th program. Please plan to attend!
- Tony Czarnecki

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2 years ago #47
Ben
Guest

Thank you all for the amazing infromation. I have been doing research on my ancestor who fought with the 59th New York and survived the battle. His name was Ambrose F. Cole. He enlisted as a first sargent, was promoted to command of company B eventually and at the close of the war was a captain.

here is a copy of a letter written by him to the local paper.

Army Correspondence.
Headquarters, 59th N. Y. V., near STEVENBURG,
Va., 3d Brig. 2d Div. 2d Corps, Dec. 25th.
Mr. EDITOR—Dear Sir:—Permit me to say through the columns of the Journal & Republican, for the information of those in Lewis County, who have friends serving in the 59th, that the entire Regiment have re-enlisted for the term of three years or during the war. The regiment will retire within a few days from the front where it has served for over two years, and proceed directly to N. Y. State and report to Brig. Gen. Haze, for furloughs for thirty-five days for the men under General Orders, No. 179 —After which, the regiment will be assigned to the recruiting service in different portions of the State for the Veteran Corps. A detachment from the regiment will rendezvous at Lowville, Lewis County, during the winter months, on special duty.
This regiment has seen much hard service, as well as the Brigade with which it is connected. It has been in nearly all the battles of the army of the Potomac during the last two years, it is composed in part of tough, hardy fellows from Lewis County, who have represented the County nobly in many hot contested battles. It was a favorite regiment with Gen'ls Sumner, Sedgwick and Howard, who commanded the 2d corps at different times during the peculiar changes of the army of the Potomac.
The regiment has never had but few accessions to its noble ranks since its organization, and consequently its numbers at this time are very small, but the few left are valuable soldiers for Uncle Sam, as he pays them a bounty of nearly eight hundred dollars for their re-enlistment during the war. This is a rare chance for veteran soldiers to join this distinguished regiment of veterans.
Most respectfully you obd't serv't.
A. F. C.
Capt., &c., 59th N. Y. V.


I have included a photo of him below.

Any information you could give would be much appreciated!!!

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2 years ago #48
Brian
Guest

I'm late finding this, but thanks Lyn for sharing about your GGGrandfather! I've just got to him during the process of adding to a roster of the men at Antietam, and you helped me get his name right - the NY Adjutant General had it wrong :/

Thanks also for posting his burial info and birth year. Good hunting in your research and best wishes with the writing project.

Regards,
Brian Downey
Antietam on the Web

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1 year ago #49
Michael Mueller
Guest

Lyn,

The 59th New York was one of twenty-five regiments raised by the State of New York in response to President Lincolns call for additional volunteers in July, 1861. It was a composite regiment made up of incomplete regiments and companies. Many individuals were authorized to raise regiments but even though being given extensions to complete their regiments or companies, many still failed to do so. In order to get regiments into the field, the state authorities started putting regiments together piece meal. The 59th was a perfect example of this. Companies A through G were formed from four incomplete regiments, Company H from a company from Ohio, and the remaining companies of the regiment from incomplete companies.

In June of 1862, after more than five months of duty in defense of Washington, D.C. and a month of garrison duty at Fort Pennsylvania, the regiment was ordered to the Virginia peninsula where it joined the Army of the Potomac at Harrison’s Landing. It arrived just after the Battle of Malvern Hill having been delayed coming down the Chesapeake Bay due to inclement weather. It did participate in skirmishes following the main battle and suffered its first battle casualties there. At the end of this campaign, it moved north with the army eventually arriving at Sharpsburg.

When Sedgewicks Division moved out across the fields, each brigade was deployed in battle line one behind the other. The 59th was positioned in the middle of the center brigade. As Confederate pressure was being felt on the left flank, the two regiments to the left of the 59th were peeled off to the left and lost to the formation. As the rest of the division continued forward, the 59ths line of march was such that the left of the regiment extended further than that of the 20 MA which was the leftmost regiment in the lead brigade.

The divisions forward motion was checked when they found themselves atop a limestone ridge with the ground sharply dropping away in their front. To engage, the regiment was forced to move forward to the edge of the ridge so they could see enemy. Upon doing so, they were met by a volley of Confederate fire. It was this first volley that staggered the regiment dropping all but one member of the Color Guard. The section of ridge that ran through the 59th’s position did so at an oblique angle forcing the left wing of the regiment to swing forward. This exposed their left flank even more to the Confederate pressure coming from that direction. Seeing that they were in a precarious position, the drummer boys were told to skedaddle. As they had no orders to retreat, the regiment stood their ground until General Sumner himself rode through the lines and gave the order to do so. Colonel Tidball gave the order for the men to rally on the colors. Lt Colonel Stetson over on the right had turned the right wing of the regiment so it fronted south. It was along this new line that the regiment attempted to reform. The Lt Colonel was repeating the order to rally when he was shot and fell from his horse mortally wounded.

I should mention that it has been documented that at the onset of the fighting, the right wing of the regiment was attempting to shoot through the ranks of the 20th MA which masked it. This action killed and wounded many of the boys of the Bay State before General Sumner rode up and ordered them to cease fire.

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