2 years ago#1
mlady
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is 1st lieut.j.a. mower posted at camp verde texas 1860 the same gen j.a. mower 1865

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2 years ago#2
Taylor
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Guest:

Still looking into this one for you.

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2 years ago#3
mlady
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thanks for helping out I have a document fromcamp verde signed J.A. mower. and I am trying to track down who he was

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2 years ago#4
Taylor
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Blogs: 22
Forum: 1,646
Votes: 14

Mlady:

I enlisted the help of the Library of Congress and normally they take about 3 - 5 days to get back to me, but today it was only a matter of a few hours. Lieut. J.A. Mowers and General Joseph A. Mowers are indeed the same person, and I've included a detailed biography for your perusal.

"Mower, Joseph Anthony (22 Aug. 1827-6 Jan. 1870), soldier, was born in Woodstock, Vermont, the son of Nathaniel Mower and Sophia Holmes, farmers. When he was six his family moved to Lowell, Massachusetts, where he received a public school education. In 1843 he returned to his native state and for two years studied at Norwich University. He left the carpenter's trade in 1846 to enlist in the Mexican War, serving for two years as a private soldier. In 1851 he married Betsey A. Bailey; the number of their children, if any, is unknown. Four years later, pursuing his enthusiasm for military life, he secured a direct commission into the army as second lieutenant, First U.S. Infantry. A few months after the Civil War began, Mower attained the rank of captain.

Stationed in Missouri when fighting broke out, Mower soon came to the attention of local authorities. When another transplanted New Englander, Colonel Joseph B. Plummer of the Eleventh Missouri Volunteers, was named a brigadier general late in 1861, he recommended Mower to replace him. Following Mower's conspicuous service in command of a siege train in the battle of New Madrid, 12-13 March 1862, the Eleventh Missouri decided that he was "a fit man to command," and on 3 May Mower was elected to the vacant colonelcy. From the first he proved a popular choice. The regiment came to regard him as strict but fair-minded, a plain-spoken leader worthy of admiration for his good judgment, his grace under fire, and his "eagle eye" for defensible terrain.

Less than a week after assuming command of his regiment, Mower received a regular army brevet for gallantry at Farmington, Mississippi. He moved up to brigade command in Major General William S. Rosecrans's Army of the Mississippi three months later. After the battle of Iuka, 19 September 1862, in which Mower, with a part of his brigade, came to the timely support of embattled comrades, Rosecrans noted that the colonel's "gallantry is equaled only by his energy." On the second day of the fighting at Corinth, 4 October, Mower had his horse shot from under him and received a wound in the neck while leading a reconnaissance-in-force; he fell into Confederate hands, only to be rescued when the enemy retreated late in the day. By year's end, Mower had risen to brigadier general of volunteers while receiving yet another brevet in the regular service.

At the outset of the Vicksburg campaign, Mower took command of a brigade in Major General William T. Sherman's Fifteenth Corps. In a brief time he became a valued subordinate in the eyes of both Sherman and Major General Ulysses S. Grant, commander of the Army of the Tennessee. In mid-May Sherman successfully entrusted him with destroying the military potential of Jackson, Mississippi, stronghold of Confederate general Joseph E. Johnston, by burning large portions of it to the ground. Early in June Grant dispatched Mower on reconnaissance missions to Mechanicsburg, Mississippi, and Richmond, Louisiana. After Vicksburg's fall in July, Mower was given a series of semi-independent commands in southern Mississippi, northern Louisiana, and Middle Tennessee. In March 1864 he led a detachment of Grant's army to the Department of the Gulf and distinguished himself throughout the Red River campaign, particularly at Fort de Russy (14 Mar.), Pleasant Hill (9 Apr.), and Yellow Bayou (18 May). Despite his efforts, the campaign closed in Union defeat, whereupon Mower returned to district command in Tennessee and Mississippi. In that capacity he guarded territory that had long been the objective of Major General Nathan Bedford Forrest, the Confederacy's most successful cavalry commander.

Following Forrest's defeat of a large Union force at Brice's Crossroads, 10 June 1864, Sherman vowed to track him down with forces under "two officers at Memphis who will fight all the time, [Major General] A. J. Smith and Mower." Later Sherman vowed that "if Mower will whip Forrest I will pledge him my influence for a Major General and will ask the President as a personal favor to hold a vacancy for him." Sherman was as good as his word: Mower received his second star 12 August, one month after his four brigades overtook Forrest near Tupelo, Mississippi, repulsed a series of attacks, and inflicted hundreds of casualties, including the slight wounding of Forrest himself. A day after his promotion, Mower again defeated Forrest's command at Hurricane Creek, Mississippi, forcing a portion of the rebel force to quit the field in confusion. In September and October, still detached from Sherman's Military Division of the Mississippi, Mower drove his First Division, Sixteenth Corps, relentlessly in pursuing Major General Sterling Price's raiders through Missouri. Following Price's rout at Westport on 23 October, Mower rejoined Sherman, now in Atlanta, and prepared to accompany him on his March to the Sea.

For a time after reaching Atlanta, Mower led the Seventeenth Corps, although he reverted to divisional command when Sherman moved toward the coast. Although his command fought few pitched battles on the road to Savannah, it saw heavy fighting outside the city on 9-11 December. After the fall of the citadel, Mower ranged northward through the Carolinas. His command forced its way through miles of swamps to defeat rebel forces along the Salkehatchie River (3 Feb. 1865). The division was also successful in action on the South Edisto River (9 Feb.) and near Cheraw, South Carolina (3 Mar.). In these and other actions Mower so distinguished himself that on 2 April he was given command of the Twentieth Corps.

Unlike many of his prewar colleagues, Mower elected to remain in the regular army, at reduced rank, when the volunteer service was disbanded. In July 1866 he was commissioned colonel of the newly organized Thirty-ninth U.S. Infantry, composed of black troops. Three years later he was transferred to the command of another black regiment, the Twenty-fifth Infantry. In the postwar years he commanded a series of occupation areas in the South, notably the Eastern District of Texas, the Fifth Military District at New Orleans (1867-1868), and later the Department of Louisiana. For a part of this period he also served as assistant commissioner of the Freedmen's Bureau in Louisiana. While on duty in New Orleans, he died suddenly of pneumonia.

Mower was one of the few Civil War commanders to achieve distinction in, successively, regimental, brigade, division, and corps command; never was he elevated beyond his ability. Even fewer Union officers attained as many citations and brevets for gallantry as he did. A major reason for his consistent success was his willingness to fight on any terrain, against any opposition, if he believed that skill and daring could carry the day. Late in the war Sherman, who placed his utmost trust in Mower, called him "the boldest young soldier we have."


I hope that the above information is of help to you.

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2 years ago#5
mlady
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thanks for your help. I think my document by 1st lieut. j.a. Mower is the same man signed before the war. thanks

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