3 years ago
N. Cook
Platinum Member
Blogs: 0
Forum: 416
Votes: 3

If any of you have wondered why my name is listed as N. Cook, it is because I have taken the name of my great great grandfather, Nathaniel Cook who was in the Civil War. Nathaniel Cook was born between 1835 and 1838 (exact date not known) in Harrison County, Kentucky. He was the son of William Cook and Charity Florence Cook. He married my great great grandmother, Ellen Jane Florence on May 11, 1858 in Harrison County, Kentucky. They had two children Sarah Sally Cook also known as Dixie who is my great grandmother and Nathan Humphrey Cook, who was born 2 months after Nathaniel was wounded in action at the Battle of Middle Creek and died from that wound on Jan. 10, 1862.

Nathaniel Cook enlisted in the Confederate Cavalry, Company a, Kentucky 1st Cavalry Battalion on October 20, 1861 at Prestonburg, Kentucky. He was at the Battle of Middle Creek in Kentucky and was mortally wounded. He was taken by soldiers in his company to area near Beaver Creek, Floyd County, Kentucky on the Gearheart Farm. He died there on Jan. 10, 1862 and was buried by Joseph Gearheart in the Gearheart family cemetery. At the time, he was an unknown Confederate soldier. He was later identified. On November 1, 2003 a new military headstone was set for Private Nathaniel Cook in the Cemetery.

I am so glad this stone was placed for him and honor his memory and courage during the war.

Answer
3 years ago
glorybound
Silver Member
Blogs: 0
Forum: 130
Votes: 1
N. Cook wrote:
If any of you have wondered why my name is listed as N. Cook, it is because I have taken the name of my great great grandfather, Nathaniel Cook who was in the Civil War. Nathaniel Cook was born between 1835 and 1838 (exact date not known) in Harrison County, Kentucky. He was the son of William Cook and Charity Florence Cook. He married my great great grandmother, Ellen Jane Florence on May 11, 1858 in Harrison County, Kentucky. They had two children Sarah Sally Cook also known as Dixie who is my great grandmother and Nathan Humphrey Cook, who was born 2 months after Nathaniel was wounded in action at the Battle of Middle Creek and died from that wound on Jan. 10, 1862.

Nathaniel Cook enlisted in the Confederate Cavalry, Company a, Kentucky 1st Cavalry Battalion on October 20, 1861 at Prestonburg, Kentucky. He was at the Battle of Middle Creek in Kentucky and was mortally wounded. He was taken by soldiers in his company to area near Beaver Creek, Floyd County, Kentucky on the Gearheart Farm. He died there on Jan. 10, 1862 and was buried by Joseph Gearheart in the Gearheart family cemetery. At the time, he was an unknown Confederate soldier. He was later identified. On November 1, 2003 a new military headstone was set for Private Nathaniel Cook in the Cemetery.

I am so glad this stone was placed for him and honor his memory and courage during the war.


Thanks for the info on your ancestor, Donna. It's really fortunate that his final resting place was finally discovered and he was identified. In the case of Kentuckians in the civil war, there were of course many who fought for the North, and many who fought for the South, sometimes from the same town, and even the same families. Do you happen to know anything as to why Nathaniel chose to fight for the Confederacy? Just curious.

Lee
Reply
3 years ago
N. Cook
Platinum Member
Blogs: 0
Forum: 416
Votes: 3

I don't know why he fought for Confederacy. I do wish I did. I know that two of his brothers fought for the Union. I am checking into others, as he came from a large family.

Harrison County, Kentucky was divided as to being for North and South as can be seen with this family.

Reply
3 years ago
Taylor
Champion
Blogs: 23
Forum: 1,702
Votes: 14

Donna:

I'm glad to hear that your gg grandfather was finally honoured in this way.

Reply
3 years ago
N. Cook
Platinum Member
Blogs: 0
Forum: 416
Votes: 3

I have all his military records. On his Appraisement Roll dated Nov. 22, 1861, in Russell County, Virginia, he is listed as having a chestnut horse valued at $135. I know it had to be his horse he brought with him when he enlisted. I have always wondered after reading that, what happened to his horse after he was shot and died. I wonder if the horse was shot, or when they took him to the Gearheart Farm that Joseph Gearheart kept the horse or his Company took the horse with them.

Reply
3 years ago
glorybound
Silver Member
Blogs: 0
Forum: 130
Votes: 1
N. Cook wrote:
I have all his military records. On his Appraisement Roll dated Nov. 22, 1861, in Russell County, Virginia, he is listed as having a chestnut horse valued at $135. I know it had to be his horse he brought with him when he enlisted. I have always wondered after reading that, what happened to his horse after he was shot and died. I wonder if the horse was shot, or when they took him to the Gearheart Farm that Joseph Gearheart kept the horse or his Company took the horse with them.


yeah that would be something that would really be neat to find out, what happened to the horse. I think it must've been a fairly good horse if it cost 135.00, that seems to me to be a lot of money in those days.

Lee
Reply
3 years ago
N. Cook
Platinum Member
Blogs: 0
Forum: 416
Votes: 3

That seemed like a lot of money for a horse to me too. He is listed as a farmer on some other papers I have. His father was farmer too. That area of Kentucky is part of Bluegrass country and would have good horses.

Reply
3 years ago
macreverie
Champion
Blogs: 31
Forum: 1,054
Votes: 17

That would be somewhere around $3400 in today's dollars. Not to much to pay for a good horse especially if you were going to war and your life might depend on him.

Recent Blog Post: Was Lincoln a fascist?
Reply
3 years ago
macreverie
Champion
Blogs: 31
Forum: 1,054
Votes: 17

An example of the worth of a good horse:
(from the ballad of Willy Gilliland))

“My bonny mare! I've ridden you when Claver'se rode behind,
And from the thumbscrew and the boot you bore me like the wind;
And, while I have the life you saved, on your sleek flank I swear,
Episcopalian rowel shall never ruffle hair!

.........................................

"And once more to his bonny mare he gives the spur and rein;
Then some with sword, and some with gun, they ride and run amain!
But sword and gun, and whip and spur, that day they plied in vain!
Ah! little thought Willy Gilliland, when he on Skerry side
Drew bridle first, and wiped his brow after that weary ride,"

Recent Blog Post: Was Lincoln a fascist?
Reply
3 years ago
N. Cook
Platinum Member
Blogs: 0
Forum: 416
Votes: 3

In doing some research today I came across an interesting article, "The Civil War In Harrison County". This is county that Nathaniel Cook was born in and lived until he enlisted in service. He would have continued to live there, but unfortunately being killed in war prevented that.

The article states that after" the fall of Fort Sumter, Harrison County responded with six Confederate and two Union companies, along with several Home Guard units. Over 1400 eventually went to war, split 63% Confederate and 37% Union." This shows more folks supported the Confederacy in this county of Kentucky. Thus, it gives me some idea why my great great grandfather joined Company A, 1st Battalion Cavalry CSA.

As to his horse, I know it had to be very important to him. It just seemed a lot for a farmer of modest means to have. However, horses were very important in this area of Kentucky and even back then came from good stock.

Reply
3 years ago
glorybound
Silver Member
Blogs: 0
Forum: 130
Votes: 1
N. Cook wrote:
In doing some research today I came across an interesting article, "The Civil War In Harrison County". This is county that Nathaniel Cook was born in and lived until he enlisted in service. He would have continued to live there, but unfortunately being killed in war prevented that.

The article states that after" the fall of Fort Sumter, Harrison County responded with six Confederate and two Union companies, along with several Home Guard units. Over 1400 eventually went to war, split 63% Confederate and 37% Union." This shows more folks supported the Confederacy in this county of Kentucky. Thus, it gives me some idea why my great great grandfather joined Company A, 1st Battalion Cavalry CSA.

As to his horse, I know it had to be very important to him. It just seemed a lot for a farmer of modest means to have. However, horses were very important in this area of Kentucky and even back then came from good stock.


Thanks for the follow-up research on your ancestor, and yes, it appears that Harrison County produced many more soldiers for the Confederacy than the US. That type of thing has always created intense interest for me, as I would born and raised in Indiana on the Kentucky border, and am well acquainted with Kentucky. It has a fascinating history during the war, and has always been a source of amazement and awe for me, just imagining the emotional upheaval that must have taken place within the counties, towns, and even family homes when it came to declaring one's allegiance. Absolutely fascinating info. thank you.

Lee
Reply
3 years ago
N. Cook
Platinum Member
Blogs: 0
Forum: 416
Votes: 3

Kentucky history is very interesting from the earliest to the present.

Kentucky was very divided in the Civil War. My family was very divided. I have the great great grandfather, Nathaniel Cook fighting for the Confederacy. He was as I said from Harrison County, Ky. I have my great great grandfather, Jesse Nichols fighting for the Union. He was from Franklin County, Kentucky. Cook is related through my grandfather. Nichols is related through my grandmother. I wish I knew more about them and why they choose the sides they did.

Reply
3 years ago
Mike D.
Champion
Blogs: 16
Forum: 1,506
Votes: 11
N. Cook wrote:
Kentucky history is very interesting from the earliest to the present.

Kentucky was very divided in the Civil War. My family was very divided. I have the great great grandfather, Nathaniel Cook fighting for the Confederacy. He was as I said from Harrison County, Ky. I have my great great grandfather, Jesse Nichols fighting for the Union. He was from Franklin County, Kentucky. Cook is related through my grandfather. Nichols is related through my grandmother. I wish I knew more about them and why they choose the sides they did.


Donna, your thread reminded me of these letters between cousins who chose different sides. Thet were from a Maryland family but the sentiments are likely very similar to those in all border states & indeed the entire country. These boys/men had grown up together all their lives. They lived on the same street in Union Mills, just over a dozen miles south of the Mason Dixon Line. Sorry I couldn't find the entire content of the letters, but these excerpts do provide an example of how divided one family could be.

'Lum', saw martial law installed in Maryland by the Federal Government. He saw 75,000 vols enlisted to force sovereign (likely his view) Southern States into subjugation. For men like him this meant tyranny. 'Lum' Shriver joined a Confederate Cavalry unit.

Aust, saw the South as illegally rebelling against rightful government authority & the demise of his nation. He would join a Pennsylvania Infantry regiment & fight to save his country.


'My dear Aust:
'... Now I think the only patriots in the land are the Southerners, and in a little while you who have brought about this 'unholy war' will be brought to your senses. You will be those who in the sight of future generations will justly merit a name more dishonorable and disgraceful than Rebel. I would soon live under the Queen of England than our current ruler.
I will stop, tis useless to extenuate. I suppose you will hardly read what I have already written and I might in my warmth of feeling say something which would provoke you to anger. Though, dear Aust, we can not agree upon the political subject now before us, you will now and ever after and under all circumstances have in me, I am sure, as good a friend and as affectionate a cousin as any other man. Let not political differences intrude upon our friendship... '

Christopher Columbus Shriver
Baltimore, June 21, 1861


'My dear 'Lum'
'...When Lincoln said that the states had to be either all free or all slave, he meant that in the natural course of events they would ultimately be so. He did not mean the Republican Party intended to do it. This is the true meaning of the speech.
'Lum, I have told you all this because I want you to know there are reasons for my course, and not only the ones I have given but numberless others. How anyone can compare the Revolution down South with the glorious one in which our forefathers rebelled against a government whose very oppressions planted them in America, I am unable to conceive. This tyrannical Lincoln, as you think, is only thing to save us and our nation from eternal ruin...'

Frederick Austin Shriver
Union Mills, June 30, 1861
Reply
3 years ago
glorybound
Silver Member
Blogs: 0
Forum: 130
Votes: 1

Mike, thanks for posting those letters, they illustrate what's always fascinated me about Kentucky in the war. Great post.

Lee

Reply
3 years ago
Mike D.
Champion
Blogs: 16
Forum: 1,506
Votes: 11

Whoops accidental post

Reply
3 years ago
Mike D.
Champion
Blogs: 16
Forum: 1,506
Votes: 11
glorybound wrote:
Mike, thanks for posting those letters, they illustrate what's always fascinated me about Kentucky in the war. Great post.

Lee


Thanks Lee, its a fascinating subject in general. So many families divided. I love to read these post & its great to contribute if possible.
Reply
3 years ago
N. Cook
Platinum Member
Blogs: 0
Forum: 416
Votes: 3

Mike thanks also for posting letters.

Donna

Reply
3 years ago
N. Cook
Platinum Member
Blogs: 0
Forum: 416
Votes: 3

Wish me luck. I do a presentation on my great great grandfather , Nathaniel Cook for the United Daughters of the Confederacy Chapter I recently became member. I hope it goes well. I am fortunate to have a lot of information on him.

Reply
3 years ago
Ajhall
Master
Blogs: 28
Forum: 3,911
Votes: 13

Best of luck to you! Let us know how it goes.

Reply
3 years ago
Taylor
Champion
Blogs: 23
Forum: 1,702
Votes: 14

Donna:

When is your presentation?

Reply
3 years ago
N. Cook
Platinum Member
Blogs: 0
Forum: 416
Votes: 3

The presentation is on Saturday, April 7th.

Reply
3 years ago
Taylor
Champion
Blogs: 23
Forum: 1,702
Votes: 14

Donna:

I'm sure you'll do great but please let us know how it goes!

Reply
3 years ago
N. Cook
Platinum Member
Blogs: 0
Forum: 416
Votes: 3

My presentation went very well today. They enjoyed hearing about him the person as well as his military record. They really enjoyed the different handouts I had and photos. I was really glad I could honor my great great grandfather by telling his story.

Reply
3 years ago
Donny
Blogs: 0
Forum: 2,563
Votes: 15

That's so cool. I'm happy for you.

Reply
3 years ago
Taylor
Champion
Blogs: 23
Forum: 1,702
Votes: 14

Donna - that's awesome. Did you get any pics?

Reply
2 years ago
noman
Guest
Reply
2 years ago
N. Cook
Platinum Member
Blogs: 0
Forum: 416
Votes: 3

Norman
Thanks for sites. I should have posted them with my original post. It does show picture of his grave which one of my cousin's took.

I wrote that memorial on find a grave. Nathaniel Cook is my great great grandfather.

Donna

Reply
2 years ago
noman
Guest

Glad to be of help

Reply
By entering this site you declare you read and agreed to its Terms, Rules & Privacy and you understand that your use of the site's content is made at your own risk and responsibility.
Copyright © 2006 - 2015 American Civil War Forum