5 years ago#1
PeteHeron
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This battle produced three future Presidents.
In this battle, when the tide turned freakishly, almost treasonously, the opportunity arose to test massive, repeating firepower against forces ten times their number. Who was it? What were their arms? And do you think they could have stemmed the tide?
You've heard the joke, when someone is surrounded and they say, "I've got them right where I want them."
The immediate aftermath of this battle produced that result to a small degree, though no one would have believed it at the time until new management took over and sorted things out.
What am I talking about?
Finally, two eastern generals played significant roles, one in the first battle, the other in the final aftermath. Who were they and what side were they on?

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5 years ago#2
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i have to go to work but i will think of this quiz and try to answer it,by presidents do you mean usa or any country?harrisson mckinley, hayes were in the east,garfild grant in the west didnt the future head of switserland fight this a tough question any more clues?fort donelson?

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5 years ago#3
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Answer: Chatanooga, East General
1st one: Baldy Smith
2nd: Hooker
Presidents: Grant, Garfield, Howard (President Friedman's Bureau)
Weapon might be starvation, but not sure.

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5 years ago#4
PeteHeron
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Good try, compadres:
1. Garfield, Hayes, McKinley...unsure of order.
2. The Lightning Brigade, equipped with Spencer repeating rifles(seven rounds, rate of fire twenty to thirty rounds a minute). On Horseback, over a thousand men. COuld they have stemmed Longstreet's breakthrough, backed up by other Confederates to a tune of nearly ten thousand men? I wonder..but Charles Dana of the War Department overrode the commanding officer and forstalled Col. Wilder's desire to engage en masse; the Brigade did remain on the field, given valuable assistance to Gen. Thomas.(Lack of nerver on Dana's part?
We know this forced Union troops into Chattanooga, surrounded by the Confederates, who nearly starved the Union troops, but...I'm not so sure they were in the danger they felt they were in; in the meantime they held the Confederates in place as well.
3. The eastern generals. I've already given one: James Longstreet, newly arrived from the Confederate eastern front. The second, someone gave the answer: Fighting Joe Hooker, also from the Eastern front, Union.
A final note: on the left flank held by Gen. Thomas, another repeating rifle came into play, but with substandard performance and lack of ammo: the Colt repeating rifle, that looked like a revolver with a rifle stock and long barrel. Troops said it blew back into their eyes.
(Years ago I took my issued .38 revolver and fired leaning by a tree, my arm crooked, the gun right by the trunk, my face pretty close to the cylinder. One shot and I nearly blinded myself from the gases shooting from the cylinder; so when I read about the problems with the Colt repeaters I could empathize to a degree).

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5 years ago#5
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my spelling needs improvement-friedman should be freemans and chattanooga with two t"s-what battle do describe? hooker wasnt at chickamauga.

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5 years ago#6
PeteHeron
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Mr. Kakman, I beg your pardon and should have been clearer. I meant Longstreet for the first battle, meaning Chicamauga, and Hooker for the 'aftermath,' meaning after Chicamauga, in Chattanooga. Indeed, Hooker played no part and was no where near the entire area of Chicamauga; not coming up until the Union was fully entrenched in Chattanooga.
I still find it troubling and odd that Gen.Meade and Gen. Lee responded in similar wars to 'difficult yet valuable' generals; both deciding to send their general out west.
I guess with winter approaching, Longstreet and Hooker could be used elsewhere for a while.

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5 years ago#7
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hooker had resigned from command,meade was in charge there was no place for hooker in aop,plus he was lucky to have a command after chamcllorville he had friends in congress.longstreet had been whispering in davis'ear about independant command,lee felt loss at the two divisions of 1st corps deffinatly but probelly glad to have pete gone for awhile he wasnt exactly on same page as lee at gettysburg,lee did lean on him so i guess after awhile he'd miss him.the desision though was davis,an order was an order.hayes and mckinley never served at those battles hayes was in ohio i believeat that time .mckinley was in west virginia with 23 ohio.

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5 years ago#8
PeteHeron
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I have spent two exhausting hours researching. Well, I'd rather be wrong and corrected than to think I am right and remain ignorant.
Chicamauga was the first battle I researched ten years ago, having driven through it and catching the civil war bug.
I sincerely believed I had read those names of presidents having served at chicamauga; I remember being struck by that fact, though all were in various stages of command, rank, and age.
It seems I was wrong...and it feels humiliating, but moreso sad because if there was one fact I felt certain about, it was that one learned ten years ago.
A long time ago someone said if I want to learn to pronounce big words correctly than I had to use them in speech. Many times I was laughed at, but I learned the correct pronunciation. The same applies here; I can but put forth what I think I know; if it stands then all well and good. If it is wrong, and I am corrected, then I am a better and more educated person for it.
I will assure everyone that before I venture forth any more facts I will research beforehand.

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5 years ago#9
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a gallant reply,your sword is return with honor,sir,with my humble respect.

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