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The Most Remarkable Survivor of the Civil War.
Jacob C. Miller, August 4, 1840-January 13, 1917. formerly a private in company K 9th Indiana Vol. Inf. was wounded in the head near the Brock Field at the Battle of Chickamauga on the morning of ...
by Rhea Cole
The Confederate Half-Brothers, And Brothers-In-Law, Of Mary Todd Lincoln
President Lincoln reportedly once said of his wife's family, "God Almighty is perfectly content having one "d" at the end of his name. The Todds insist on having two". The strained relationship ...
by EastTennessee1948
Holt Collier : Slave, Confederate Soldier, Cowboy, Big Game Hunter, And Presidential Hunting Guide
I was in Gen.Ross’ Brigade, Colonel Dudley Jones Regiment and Captain. Perry Evans Company I 9th Texas Cavalry Regiment. My Old Colonel. gave me a horse.... one of three fine race horses he ...
by EastTennessee1948
Newton Knight: Hero Of Jones County or Outlaw?
Newton (Newt) Knight’s story is little known and was exciting for me to recently discover. A farmer and eventually Confederate soldier, Newt led a group of fighters in an attempt to secede ...
by Taylor
The Social Dip, Southern Women Loved Their Snuff
In her article, 'The "Social Dip": Tobacco Use by Mid-19th Century Southern Women" Vicki Betts chronicles tobacco use by Southern women. Her intent is to provide background information for ...
by Rhea Cole
The economic causes of the civil war
I have lately come to the opinion that slavery per se had nothing to do with starting the war, rather, economics is at the heart of the issue. The South was a voting bloc in the Congress and ...
by Seamuson
Smoothbore vs Rifled Muskets...Did They Really Make That Much Difference?
Introduction Ajhall issued the challenge, to prove whether or not the rifled musket really made that much difference in warfare, the conventional wisdom being that the greater accuracy of the ...
by fstroupe
Mary <email> : "Please Don't Let Me Fall"
The case against Mary <email> is still the subject of much controversy and debate, even one hundred and fifty years after this complex woman swung from the gallows on a sweltering hot day in July. ...
by Taylor
Best Article Ever on the Declaration of Causes for Secession.
In the last few days, I have had an article forwarded to me by an unusual collection of historians, scholastic, National Park, & living history. Believe me when I say that this does not ...
by Rhea Cole
Did the Dred Scott Decision Actually Cause the War?
I recently made a comment in a post to the effect that if you didn't study American politics for the 40 or so years leading up to the secession of the Southern states, there was no way you could ...
by fstroupe
Nathan B. Forrest: A Man Without Rest
I watched in horror when 4 days before Christmas, the statue of Nathan B. Forrest was pulled to the ground in Memphis, Tennessee, to cheering crowds. Jefferson Davis’ statue in New Orleans ...
by Taylor
General Robert E. Lee’s Ceremonial Sword
On the 9th of April 1865 Confederate General Robert E. Lee put on his best dress uniform and donned his ceremonial sword then set of on his horse Traveler. His distention was the home of Wilmer and ...
by Ron S.
Rich Man's War: Poor Man's Bounty Jumping
Rich Man’s War. Poor Man’s Fight. How often these few simple words have been bandied about over the years when attempting to capture some of the more mercenary aspects of the ...
by Taylor
John Salling : The Confederacy's Last "Peter-Monkey"
There's no debate that John Salling died on March 15, 1959. What is up for debate, is the year he was born. At the time of his death, he was recognized as one of the last three surviving veterans ...
by EastTennessee1948
The Real William Pinkney Inman Of Cold Mountain
He was born in 1840. The sixth of eight children (6 boys 2 girls), born to Joshua and Mary Smith Inman in the Bethel Community of Haywood County, NC. Only two of their six sons would survive the ...
by EastTennessee1948
Adelicia & Isaac Franklin, a real life beauty & the beast.
In my blog, 'Fort Negley; the Confederacy was a Deadman Walking', Signal Officer Captain McClintock describes signalizing from atop the water tower in the garden of Belmont mansion in Nashville. He ...
by Rhea Cole
African Heritage and Southern Hearts : "Free Persons Of Color" and Faithful Servants With The ...
J.W. Comer achieved the rank of 1st Sergeant and was stationed in Mobile and Pollard until 1864. Comer joined the Alabama 27th Infantry Regiment as a Lieutenant in 1864 and followed them to ...
by EastTennessee1948
Model 1860 Light Cavalry Saber
The Model 1860 Light Cavalry Saber was the replacement for the Model 1840 Heavy Cavalry Saber. The Model 1840 Heavy Cavalry Saber was heavier and longer then the Model 1860 Light Cavalry Saber. ...
by Ron S.
Was Lincoln a fascist?
I know our politically correct, abeophllic friends have already went berserk at the mere mention of their hero and the term ‘fascist’ in the same sentence above and they probably ...
by macreverie
Phenomenal Women: Unsung Heroes of the American Civil War
So much focus has been paid to the courageous men who fought brilliantly on both sides of the war, that we tend to forget the war efforts of the women who were left behind, and the enormous ...
by Taylor
The Civil War's Influence On The Life Theodore Roosevelt
View of Abraham Lincoln's funeral procession, April 25, 1865, showing the home of Cornelius Van Schaack Roosevelt at the corner of Broadway and Union Square in New York. Two children are ...
by EastTennessee1948
An American Hero
Back in the 1990s I was very active in the Sons of Confederate Veterans and otherwise an activist for the promotion and preservation of Confederate heritage. During that time I often heard of a ...
by fstroupe
So West Virginia was a "Free State"?!
Some Northern defenders in the Civil War Talk forum are claiming that when West Virginia was admitted to the Union in June 1863, it was a free state! A "free state"? Really? When West Virginia ...
by Mike Griffith
Mourning Etiquette of the American Civil War: Paint It Black
Deep mourning clothing (Veil on top of bonnet was lowered over face while in public) The process of mourning during the American Civil War was recognized by a sophisticated set of rules that ...
by Taylor
Different ethnicities that fought in the American Civil War
Cherokee Confederates reunion in New Orleans, 1903 Vale wrote: I was wondering if anyone could tell me about the different ethnicities (Jewish, African American, Native American, Italian, ...
by fstroupe
Slaveholding in Northern States
Today I had a curious encounter with a woman who had sought me out as an amateur Civil War historian. She had read the text of a lecture I give on the realities of slaveholding in Middle Tennessee in ...
by Rhea Cole
Controversy and tragedy at Burnside Bridge!
September 17th, 1862 shortly after 9am. Col. Kingsbury of the 11th Conn. led his regiment into their baptism by fire. The mission was to secure the stone bridge and establish a foot hold on the west ...
by Mike D.
Confederate Battle Flag Carried By The 13th North Carolina Infantry
Formerly the 3rd North Carolina Volunteers were formed at Garysburg, North Carolina in May 1861 with 1,100 men recruited in the Counties of Caswell, Mecklenburg, Davie, Edgecombe, and Rockingham. It ...
by EastTennessee1948
Six Months That Destroyed the Confederacy, without firing a shot.
Introduction The six months General William Rosecrans spent in Middle Tennessee after the Battle of Stones River destroyed the Confederacy. The Department of the Cumberland that Rosecrans ...
by Rhea Cole
The Legendary Winan's Confederate steam gun.
For years I've heard tidbits here and there about a wonder weapon produced for the Confederates and captured by the Yankee's in 1861. This mean Confederate steam machine, was reported as an early ...
by Mike D.
Why did the South support slavery if most Southerners did not own slaves?
There was the very real fear of terrorism (through a Haitian style slave insurrection) that was being morally and materially supported by some very prominent Yankee abolitionists (with ...
by macreverie
Slavery: Not Just For The South
African slavery has become such an entrenched stigma of the South that it’s often easy for people to forget that this ‘peculiar
by Taylor
Reluctant Rebels And "Home-Grown Yankees": White Southern Men In The Union Ranks
There were white southern regiments from every Confederate State, with the exception of South Carolina, and there were South Carolina men in other units. Most were good soldiers, many weren't. Very ...
by EastTennessee1948
Why did Southerners vote for secession?
Here (in my humble opinion at least) is the list of reasons (in descending order of importance/influence) that led the vast majority of the electorate of the South (something on the order of more ...
by macreverie
In The Words Of Those That Fought : Slaves, Slavery, And Race
The Confederates : 2nd Lieutenant James Henry Langhorne, Company G 4th Virginia Infantry, was wounded at 1st Manassas and captured at Kernstown. His younger brother Jacob, was mortally wounded in ...
by EastTennessee1948
Battle of the Cedars, the Third & General Forrest's Last Battle of Murfreesboro 1864
The last days of fall 1864 in Middle Tennessee were dark, wet, temperatures swapping between freeze & thaw like a whipsaw. No sane person would go camping at that time of year, let alone fight a ...
by Rhea Cole
The Civil War's Version Of Bonnie And Clyde : Keith and Malinda Blaylock Union Partisans or Yankee ...
It all depended on the side one was on ! William McKesson "Keith" Blaylock and Sarah Malinda Pritchard were born in the mid-late 1830's in the shadow of Grandfather Mountain in western NC. ...
by EastTennessee1948
Lewis Wallace: Disgraced General to Best Selling Author
Lewis (Lew) Wallace was born on April 10, 1827, in Brookville, Indiana. His lifetime achievements are a fascinating tale - from General Grant using him as his scapegoat at Shiloh, to that of ...
by Taylor
General Ulysses S Grant's CW Presentation Sword
As a life long collector of Civil War Weapons I thought I would share "My Fantasy". Inscribed “General in Chief of the United States Army, 1864” A "Magnificent Sword For General Grant!" ...
by Gettysburg Echos
General George McClellan's Fatal Flaw: Cowardice
Coward: noun 1. a person who lacks courage in facing danger, difficulty, opposition, pain, etc.; a timid or easily intimidated person. from Dictionary.com a person who is contemptibly lacking ...
by Ajhall

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